Grade 9 American History Syllabus


Somewhere in the BWCA with family. That's my trusty old canoe, over 30 years old.
Grade 9 American History Syllabus
2017-2018

Instructor:
Mr. Patrick Day is a Magna Cum Laude graduate of Southwest State University with a B.A in History and a minor in Anthropology. He is a member of the Pi Gamma Mu International Honor Society for the Social Sciences. He has Master of Science degree in Curriculum and Instruction. This year will be his 28th year teaching history in this district.

Contact:
School email:
School phone: 507.374.6305
Web site: http://www.triton.portal.rschooltoday.com


Graduation Requirements:

Students who began 9th grade in the 2004-05 school year or later must successfully complete three and one-half credits of social studies encompassing at least United States history, geography, government and citizenship, world history, and economics --or--three credits of social studies encompassing at least United States history, geography, government and citizenship, world history and one-half credit of economics taught in a school's social studies, business, or agricultural education department.

Social Studies is the study of history, humanities and the social sciences. The purpose of studying these disciplines is to prepare young people to become responsible citizens and develop social understanding. Social studies standards and curriculum build four capacities in young people: disciplinary knowledge, disciplinary skills, commitment to democratic values, and citizen participation. (Source: Academic Standards for Social Studies from the Minnesota Department of Education)

Course Description:

This course of American History covers the period of 1492-1865. We begin by examining American prehistory and then move on to Native American cultural groups, European exploration, discovery, and colonization of America. We then move on to the causes and course of the American Revolution and the founding of the U.S.A. Then we examine the growth of the new nation through the Civil War. See “Course Content” below.

Instructional Strategies:

As recommended by the American Historical Association’s “Statement on Excellent Classroom Teaching of History” the following will guide instructional strategies:

1) This course will contain sufficient factual material based on most recent research.

2) Course will explicitly present analytical concepts of historical study.

3) This course will teach historical thinking skills and give opportunity to “do” history.

4) Student will become aware of kinds of sources, finding evidence, testing evidence, etc.

5) Frequent opportunity for discussion and writing in order to learn and practice the art to interpretation.

6) Classroom will actively promote the learning of history and supply the relevant and up to date materials.

7) Since historical studies involve analysis and interpretation, student evaluation will involve “projects” that require the student to seek out and weigh appropriate evidence to answer a significant question, appropriate to their ability level, as well as traditional multiple choice type quizzes and tests.

Also, as recommended by the Minnesota Department of Education, “Best Practices” principles will be implemented as much as possible. For further information on what these “Best Practices” are, go to the Minnesota Department of Education web site and type Best Practices into the search box. It will take you to a 54 page description.

Grading:

Grades will be based upon the following:  Homework= 15%, Project=10%,  Quizzes=15%,   Test= 50%  Final= 10%.
Classroom Policies:

One of my primary responsibilities is to teach all the students in my classroom. Each student has a legal right to learn, therefore I am obligated, as best I can, to protect each student’s right to learn. No student has a right to prevent other students from learning by disruptive behavior. The following policies will help maintain a positive and comfortable learning environment:

1) Students are to come to class on time.

2) Students must sit in their assigned seats.

3) Students must not move their desks around unless instructed to do so.

4) All assignments are due on the day posted on the board. Late work will be docked points unless student has made prior arrangements. Assignments must be handed in
within two school days of due date to receive any credit.

5) If a student is absent, it is the student’s responsibility to hand in any work due from the time gone.

6) If a student is absent, it is the student’s responsibility to make up any quiz or test missed during absence. Tests and quizzes should be made up as soon as possible upon return to school. If a student does not make up a missed quiz or test within a week, Mr. Day may enter zero points for that exam into the grade book.

7) All make up tests must be taken in Mr. Day’s classroom.

8) Students are not to leave the classroom without Mr. Day’s permission.

9) Extra credit assignments may not be done during last week of a quarter and may not be done in place of regular assignments.

10) Students must not disrupt learning by excessive talking, note passing, throwing things around room, etc. All students are expected to put forth reasonable effort and cooperation.

11) Mr. Day will not tolerate any bullying by any student. Students are encouraged to report any bullying or any kind of emotional abuse.

12) All assignments are posted on the white-board in the classroom. It is the student’s responsibility to keep track of their assignments and complete them on time.

If Mr. Day can not work out all behavior issues with a student, the student will be referred to high school principal and or parents will be notified.


Course Content:

The following course outline follows the Minnesota Department of Education standards for American Historical Association:

HISTORICAL SKILLS

A. Historical Inquiry: The student will apply research skills through an in-depth investigation of a historical topic.

1. Students will define a research topic that can be studied using a variety of historical sources with an emphasis on the use of primary sources.

2. Students will identify and use repositories of research materials including libraries, the Internet, historical societies, historic sites, and archives, as appropriate for their project.

3. Students will evaluate web sites for authenticity, reliability, and bias.

4. Students will learn how to prepare for, conduct, and document an oral history.

5. Students will apply strategies to find, collect and organize historical research.

B. Historical Inquiry: The student will analyze historical evidence and draw conclusions.

1. Students will understand the use of secondary sources to provide background and insights on historical events, and that secondary sources might reflect an author’s bias.

2. Students will identify the principal formats of published secondary source material and evaluate such sources for both credibility and bias.

3. Students will compare and contrast primary sources to analyze first-hand accounts of historical events and evaluate such sources for both credibility and bias.

4. Students will review primary and secondary sources and compare and contrast their perspectives to shape their presentation of information relevant to their research topic.

5. Students will understand the historical context of their research topic and how it was influenced by, or influenced other historical events.

6. Students will evaluate alternative interpretations of their research topic and defend or change their analysis by citing evidence from primary and secondary sources.



U.S. HISTORY

A. Indigenous People of North America
The student will demonstrate knowledge of indigenous cultures in North America prior to and during western exploration.

1. Students will identify important cultural aspects and regional variations of major North American Indian nations.

B. Three Worlds Converge, 1450-1763

The student will understand how European exploration and colonization resulted in cultural and ecological interactions among previously unconnected peoples.

1. Students will identify the stages and motives of European oceanic and overland exploration from the 15th to the 17th centuries.

2. Students will describe the consequences of early interactions between Europeans and American Indian nations.

3. Students will describe key characteristics of West African kingdoms and the development of the Atlantic slave trade.

C. Three Worlds Converge, 1450-1763

The student will demonstrate knowledge of the colonies and the factors that shaped colonial North America.

1. Students will compare and contrast life within the colonies and their geographical areas, including New England, Mid-Atlantic, and Southern colonies, and analyze their impact.

2. Students will identify the growing differences and tensions between the European colonies, England and American Indian Nations.

D. Three Worlds Converge, 1450-1763

The student will understand the economic development of the English colonies in North America and the exploitation of enslaved Africans.

1. Students will describe and evaluate the enslavement of Africans, the Middle Passage and the use of slave labor in European colonies.

E. Revolution and the New Nation, 1763-1820

The student will demonstrate knowledge of the causes, course, and consequences of the American Revolution.

1. Students will analyze the major economic, political, and philosophical conflicts leading to the American Revolution including the roles of the First and Second Continental Congresses and the Declaration of Independence.

2. Students will explain how and why the Americans won the war against superior British resources, analyzing the role of key leaders, major campaigns and events, and participation by ordinary soldiers and civilians.

3. Students will explain the impact of the Revolutionary War on groups within American society, including loyalists, patriots, women and men, Euro-Americans, enslaved and free African Americans, and American Indians.

F. Revolution and the New Nation, 1763-1820

The student will understand the foundation of the American government and nation .

1. Students will identify and explain the basic principles that were set forth in the documents that declared the nation’s independence (the Declaration of Independence, inalienable rights and self-evident truths) and that established the new nation’s government (the Constitution).

2. Students will describe and evaluate the major achievements and problems of the Confederation period, and analyze the debates over the Articles of Confederation and the revision of governmental institutions that created the U.S. Constitution and the Bill of Rights, and the interpretive function of the Supreme Court.

3. Students will describe and explain the emergence of the first American party system.

G. Expansion, Innovation, and Reform, 1801-1861

The student will demonstrate knowledge of the early republic and how territorial expansion affected foreign relations.

1. Students will describe the causes and analyze the effects of the Louisiana Purchase, the War of 1812, and the Monroe Doctrine.

2. Students will analyze the impact of territorial expansion on American Indian nations and the evolution of federal and state Indian policies.

3. Students will analyze the causes and consequences of U.S. geographic expansion to the Pacific, including the concept of Manifest Destiny and the Mexican-American War.

H. Expansion, Innovation, and Reform, 1801-1861

The student will understand how explosive growth (economic, demographic, geographic) and technological innovation transformed American society.

1. Students will describe and analyze the impact of innovations in industry, technology and transportation on life in America.

2. Students will examine demographic growth and patterns of population change and their consequences for American society before the Civil War.

I. Expansion, Innovation, and Reform, 1801-1861

The student will understand the sources, characteristics, and effects of antebellum movements.

1. Students will understand the sources, characteristics and effects of cultural, religious and social reform movements, including the abolition, temperance, and women’s rights movements.

J. Expansion, Innovation, and Reform, 1801-1861

The student will understand the extension, restriction, and reorganization of political democracy after 1800.

1. Students will describe and analyze changes in American political life including the spread of universal white male suffrage, restrictions on free African Americans, and the emergence of the Second Party System.

K. Civil War and Reconstruction, 1850-1877

The student will demonstrate knowledge of the long- and short-term causes of the Civil War

1. Students will identify and explain the economic, social, and cultural differences between the North and the South.

2. Students will understand and analyze the political impact of debates over slavery and growing sectional polarization in key events including the Missouri Compromise, the Compromise of 1850 and the Fugitive Slave Law, the rise of the Republican party, the Southern secession movement and the formation of the Confederacy.

L. Civil War and Reconstruction, 1850-1877

The student will understand the course, character, and outcome of the Civil War.

1. Students will identify events and leaders of the war, and analyze how the differences in resources of the Union and Confederacy (economy, technology, demography, geography, political and military leadership) affected the course of the war and Union victory.

2. Students will describe and explain the social experience of the war on battlefield and home front, in the Union and the Confederacy.

3. Students will analyze the significance of Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address and its views of American political life.


Sources:

The preceding topics will be covered using the American history textbook, “Call to Freedom” as well as various videos, documentaries, primary sources, supplemental handout materials and internet materials.

The approximate locations in the course for the preceding material are as follows:

A and B. Historical Inquiry:
This will primarily be done by doing 1 research project
a. A family history research paper or
b. A local history research paper
.

A. Indigenous People of North America
Chapter 1, 2
B. Three Worlds Converge, 1450-1763
Chapters 1, 2, 3, 5
C. Three Worlds Converge, 1450-1763
Chapters 3, 4, 5
D. Three Worlds Converge, 1450-1763
Chapters 3, 12
E. Revolution and the New Nation, 1763-1820
Chapter 6
F. Revolution and the New Nation, 1763-1820
Chapters 6, 7, 8
G. Expansion, Innovation, and Reform, 1801-1861
Chapters 10, 11, 14
H. Expansion, Innovation, and Reform, 1801-1861
Chapter 12
I. Expansion, Innovation, and Reform, 1801-1861
Chapter 13
J. Expansion, Innovation, and Reform, 1801-1861
Chapter 15
K. Civil War and Reconstruction, 1850-1877
Chapters 15, 16, 17
L. Civil War and Reconstruction, 1850-1877
Chapters 16, 17

Course Assignments:

Students will complete assignments from Chapters 1-17 of the Textbook “Call to Freedom”. Generally for each chapter there will be four sets of worksheets worth 5 points per set, four quizzes worth 10 points each, and a chapter test ranging from 100-130 points. Students will also earn points by taking chapter notes and occasional supplemental assignments.


Some Recommended Web sites:

Minnesota Department of Education http://education.state.mn.us/mde/index.html
National Council for the Social Studies http://www.ncss.org
Minnesota Council for the Social Studies http://www.mcss.org
American Historical Association http://www.historians.org
Organization of American Historians http://www.oah.org/
Minnesota Historical Society http://www.mnhs.org


 

Contact: Patrick Day